Title: The continuous performance test, identical pairs: norms, reliability and performance in healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia in Singapore
year: 2014
Journal: Schizophr Res
Volume: 156
Issue: 02/03/2016
Pages: 233-40
Epubdate: 14/05/2014
date: Jul
Alternate Journal: Schizophrenia research
ISSN: 0920-9964
DOI: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.04.016
Accession Number: 24819191
Abstract: AIM: To provide normative values for the healthy ethnic Chinese Singaporean population and a large sample of patients with schizophrenia for the Continuous Performance Task-Identical Pairs (CPT-IP). Participants Data were collected on 1011 healthy ethnic Chinese and 654 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia, all between 21 and 55 years of age. METHODS: Data were stratified by age and gender. The effects of age, gender and education were explored in patients and controls. Performance indices were assessed in their ability to predict group inclusion. Controls' performance was compared with that reported in a US sample. RESULTS: Performance was affected by age, sex, and education, with youth, male sex and higher education providing a performance advantage. Patients' performance was lower than controls' by more than 1 standard deviation, with the 3-digit d' score most significantly discriminating between controls and patients. The effects of socio-demographic factors on performance were in line with those conducted in the US and previously reported in the literature. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest norming study ever conducted on the CPT-IP. It will enable investigators and clinicians to select appropriate indices to assess severity of cognitive decline and/or evaluate cognitive remediation therapy outcomes after taking into account age, gender and education factors.
Notes: 1573-2509
Rapisarda, Attilio
Kraus, Michael
Tan, Yi
Wen
Lam, Max
Eng, Goi Khia
Lee, Jimmy
Subramaniam, Mythily
Collinson, Simon L
Chong, Siow Ann
Keefe, Richard S E
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Netherlands
Schizophr Res. 2014 Jul
156(2-3):233-40. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.04.016. Epub 2014 May 10.
URI: https://open-access.imh.com.sg/handle/123456789/4735
Authors Address: Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore
Neuroscience & Behavioral Disorders, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore.
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center.Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.
Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore
Department of General Psychiatry 1, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore
Office of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, National University of Singapore, Singapore.
Neuroscience & Behavioral Disorders, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore.Neuroscience & Behavioral Disorders, Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore
Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center. Electronic address: richard.keefe@duke.edu.
Translated author: NLM
Translated title: eng
Appears in Collections:2014

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