Title: Shared and divergent neurocognitive impairments in adult patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Whither the evidence?
year: 2016
Journal: Neurosci Biobehav Rev
Volume: 61
Pages: 66-89
Epubdate: 23/12/2015
date: Feb
Alternate Journal: Neuroscience and biobehavioral reviews
ISSN: 0149-7634
Article Number: 26691725
Keywords: Bipolar Disorder/diagnosis/drug therapy/*psychology Cholinergic Antagonists/therapeutic use Cognition Disorders/diagnosis/*physiopathology Executive Function/*physiology Humans Psychotic Disorders/genetics/*psychology Schizophrenia/genetics/*physiopathology Bipolar disorder Neurocognitive impairments Schizophrenia
Abstract: Recent data from genetic and brain imaging studies have urged rethinking of bipolar disorder (BD) and schizophrenia (SCZ) as lying along a continuum of major endogenous psychoses rather than dichotomous disorders. We systematically reviewed extant studies (from January 2000 to July 2015) that directly compared neurocognitive impairments in adults with SCZ and BD. Within 36 included studies, comparable neurocognitive impairments were found in SCZ and BD involving executive functioning, working memory, verbal fluency and motor speed. The extent and severity of neurocognitive impairments in patients with schizoaffective disorder, and BD with psychotic features occupy positions intermediate between SCZ and BD without psychotic features, suggesting spectrum of neurocognitive impairments across psychotic spectrum conditions. Neurocognitive impairments correlated with socio-demographic (lower education), clinical (more hospitalizations, longer duration of illness, negative psychotic symptoms and non-remission status), treatment (antipsychotics, anti-cholinergics) variables and lower psychosocial functioning. The convergent neurocognitive findings in both conditions support a continuum concept of psychotic disorders and further research is needed to clarify common and dissimilar progression of specific neurocognitive impairments longitudinally.
Notes: 1873-7528 Kuswanto, Carissa Chin, Rowena Sum, Min Yi Sengupta, Somnath Fagiolini, Andrea McIntyre, Roger S Vieta, Eduard Sim, Kang Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Review United States Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2016 Feb;61:66-89. doi: 10.1016/j.neubiorev.2015.12.002. Epub 2015 Dec 12.
URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0149763415301032
URI: https://open-access.imh.com.sg/handle/123456789/5050
Authors Address: Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore. Department of General Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health/Woodbridge Hospital, Singapore, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore. Division of Psychiatry, Department of Molecular Medicine, University at Siena, Italy, Viale Bracci 1, 53100 Siena, Italy. Mood Disorders Psychopharmacology Unit, University of Toronto, University Health Network, 399 Bathurst Street, MP 9-325, Toronto, ON M5T 2S8, Canada. Bipolar Disorders Program, Institute of Neuroscience, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore; Department of General Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health/Woodbridge Hospital, Singapore, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore. Electronic address: kang_sim@imh.com.sg.
Database Provider: NLM
language: eng
Appears in Collections:2016

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