Title: Mediating effects of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes among psychiatric outpatients: findings from a cross-sectional survey in Singapore
year: 2017
Journal: BMJ Open
Volume: 7
Issue: 8
Pages: e018228
date: 01/08/2029
ISSN: 2044-6055 (Electronic);2044-6055 (Linking)
Legal note: PMC5724097
Article Number: 28851803
Keywords: adult psychiatry;mental health;public health
Abstract: OBJECTIVES: To examine whether self-stigma mediates the relationship between perceived stigma and quality of life, self-esteem and general functioning among outpatients with depression, schizophrenia, anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Outpatient clinics at a tertiary psychiatric hospital in Singapore. PARTICIPANTS: 280 outpatients with a primary clinical diagnosis of either schizophrenia, depression, anxiety or OCD. METHODS: Data were collected in relation to self-stigma, perceived stigma, self-esteem, functioning and quality of life. In order to examine the mediating role of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes, bootstrapping mediation analyses were used. RESULTS: Mediation analyses revealed that the relationship between perceived stigma and psychosocial outcomes was subject to the effects of self-stigma among the overall sample. Separate mediation analyses were conducted by diagnoses and showed differences in the mediating effects of self-stigma. Among the whole sample and the subsample with OCD, self-stigma mediated the relationship between perceived stigma and all psychosocial outcomes. For those with anxiety, depression and schizophrenia, the mediating effects of self-stigma were present in all relationships except (1) perceived stigma with physical health in the anxiety sample, (2) perceived stigma with social relationships in the depression sample and (3) perceived stigma with physical health in the schizophrenia sample. CONCLUSIONS: The mediating effects of self-stigma on the relationship between perceived stigma and various psychosocial outcomes are evident and differ across diagnoses. Interventions to address and reduce the effects of self-stigma along with targeted treatments and psychoeducation to assist people with mental illness overcome or better manage self-stigma while providing them the skills to counteract public stigma are needed.
Notes: Picco, Louisa;Lau, Ying Wen;Pang, Shirlene;Abdin, Edimansyah;Vaingankar, Janhavi Ajit;Chong, Siow Ann;Subramaniam, Mythily;eng;England;2017/08/31 06:00;BMJ Open. 2017 Aug 29;7(8):e018228. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018228.
URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28851803;https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5724097/pdf/bmjopen-2017-018228.pdf
URI: https://open-access.imh.com.sg/handle/123456789/5164
Authors Address: Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Singapore.
Appears in Collections:2017

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