Title: Hazardous alcohol use among patients with schizophrenia and depression
year: 2017
Journal: Alcohol
Volume: 65
Pages: 63-69
date: Dec
ISSN: 1873-6823 (Electronic);0741-8329 (Linking)
Article Number: 29084631
Keywords: Alcohol use disorders identification test;Asian;Depression;Hazardous alcohol use;Schizophrenia
Abstract: AIMS: The current study aimed to 1) report the prevalence of hazardous alcohol use in an outpatient population among those with schizophrenia and depressive disorders, 2) assess the sociodemographic and clinical correlates of hazardous alcohol use, 3) examine the association of hazardous alcohol use with severity of depression, anxiety and smoking, and 4) assess the association of hazardous alcohol use with quality of life. METHODS: Three hundred ten outpatients seeking treatment at a tertiary psychiatric institute with a diagnosis of either schizophrenia spectrum disorder or depressive disorder were included in the study. Patients were assessed for hazardous alcohol use using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. Information on sociodemographic correlates, clinical history, severity of symptoms of depression and anxiety, as well as quality of life (QOL) was collected. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of hazardous alcohol use among the sample was 12.6%. The prevalence of hazardous alcohol use among patients with depression and schizophrenia was 18.8% and 6.4%, respectively. Compared to those who were students, patients who were gainfully employed or unemployed were more likely to engage in hazardous alcohol use (Odds Ratio (OR) = 5.5 and 7.7, respectively). Patients with depression compared to those with schizophrenia (OR = 11.1) and those who were current smokers compared to those who had never smoked (OR = 14.5) were more likely to engage in hazardous alcohol use. Hazardous alcohol use was associated with lower QOL in the physical health domain (p = 0.002). CONCLUSION: Given the significant prevalence of hazardous alcohol use in this population, routine screening for hazardous alcohol use and brief interventions could be an effective way of managing this comorbidity. There is a need to develop and evaluate culturally appropriate brief interventions based on patient preference in this setting.
Notes: Subramaniam, Mythily;Mahesh, Mithila Valli;Peh, Chao Xu;Tan, Junda;Fauziana, Restria;Satghare, Pratika;Gupta, Bhanu;Gomathinayagam, Kandasami;Chong, Siow Ann;eng;2017/11/01 06:00;Alcohol. 2017 Dec;65:63-69. doi: 10.1016/j.alcohol.2017.07.008. Epub 2017 Sep 22.
URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29084631
URI: https://open-access.imh.com.sg/handle/123456789/5185
Authors Address: Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Buangkok Green Medical Park, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore. Electronic address: Mythily@imh.com.sg.;Research Division, Institute of Mental Health, Buangkok Green Medical Park, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore.;Department of Community Psychiatry, Institute of Mental Health, Buangkok Green Medical Park, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore.;National Addictions Management Service, Institute of Mental Health, Buangkok Green Medical Park, 10 Buangkok View, Singapore 539747, Singapore.
Appears in Collections:2017

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